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Arizona Superior Court

Your Guide to Arizona Court Records

Your Guide to Arizona Court Records

Arizona court records are usually made available to the public. In fact, cases can be looked up on the State’s website. However, some cases may be sealed to protect identities or for other reasons as seen fit by the courts. 
Arizona court records can include divorce agreements. In fact, divorce cases are considered public information. That means that any allegations made during the divorce proceedings, including infidelity and abuse, are available in the AZ court records. 
The divorce agreement is also available and it will list each and every detail of the divorce, including the amount of spousal support ordered. It may also include child custody and child support agreements, as well as other causes determined by the judge or in mediation. 
In some cases, Arizona court records may be sealed. This can be ordered by the judge for several reasons. For example, the judge my order records sealed if a minor child is involved and they are a witness in the case. The judge may wish to protect the identity of the child, especially when the case involves abuse allegations.
Arizona court records may also be sealed to protect the identity of a witness that may be in danger because they testified. The case may also be sealed if information which was presented in the case may be used at a later date, perhaps in the trial of another individual. 

Pima County Superior Court

Pima County Superior Court

The Pima County Superior Court handles a myriad of cases, including probate and mental health cases. In fact, the Pima County Superior Court is broken down into several divisions which may handle specific types of cases.
Probate cases may involve issues with a will of the estate of a benefactor.  The will must be considered legally valid in order for the assets to be distributed to the benefactors. The estate must first pay any creditors which hold a valid debt for the deceased.
If the court finds that the will is legally valid and the estate has paid any creditors, they will likely allow the estate to be distributed. However, if there are reasons why the will may not be legally valid, the Pima County Superior Court may make a determination that the case must be heard in court. 
Challenges to the will may include the mental health of the benefactor at the time they wrote the will.  If, for example, it is believed that they were not of sound mind when they wrote it, the will may be challenged. 
Many times these types of challenges can easily be laid aside by the Pima County Superior Court if there is evidence to support the fact that the benefactor willingly wrote the will and was of sound mind when they did so. 
For instance, a videotape of the will being written and signed may be used as evidence to affirm the fact that the individual was of sound mind and free of duress. However, it could also be used to show that the individual was acting oddly when they wrote the will.

Maricopa County Supreme Court

Maricopa County Supreme Court

The Maricopa County Supreme Court includes jurisdiction over many types of cases. For instance, any issues that relate to probate, including wills and estates, are heard at the Maricopa County Supreme Court. In addition, cases which include divorce are heard at the same level.
Within the Maricopa County Supreme Court is a family division of the court system. The Family Court Division handles issues such as divorce and child custody, although child custody and child support payments are handled as an issue separate from divorce.
Couples that are going through a divorce must follow the process as determined by the Maricopa County Supreme Court. Couples may be asked to first attempt to settle the divorce outside of court. The Court may appoint a mediator whose job it is to help the couple make important decisions jointly, such as the amount of spousal support payments. 
Although this process can be time consuming, it is often beneficial for a couple to at least attempt to settle the divorce in mediation. If the couple comes to a divorce agreement jointly, the judge simply needs to approve the agreement. 
Couples that are unable to handle the divorce in this way have to take the divorce to court, which can be very time consuming and expensive. The judge will make each and every determination for the divorce agreement, including spousal support payments. If the couple had a prenuptial agreement in place, the judge may go according to the clauses laid out in the agreement, but the judge may also change those clauses at will.

Pima County Justice Court

Pima County Justice Court

The Pima County Justice Court hears a variety of cases, including Small Claims Court, domestic violence cases and some civil suits.
The Pima County Justice Court hears Small Claims cases in which the individual is seeking money below a certain amount, usually one thousand dollars, for damages and other issues. For example, an individual may sue another individual if they are accusing them of causing damage to property. 
The facts of the case, including evidence and witness accounts, will be heard by the Pima County Justice Court. The Court will then make a determination of whether the accused is financially responsible for those damages based on the facts presented at trial.
Domestic violence cases can also be heard by the Pima County Justice Court. These cases may include criminal charges, attempts to receive compensation for medical bills and lost wages and restraining orders. The criminal charges may be handled as a separate case. 
If the victim is seeking compensatory damages, they must present evidence that their injuries resulted in a financial loss. For restraining orders, the victim must prove that they are in danger of being injured by the accused if they are not forced to stay away from the victim. 
The Pima County Justice Court hears many types of cases, each of which may be handled by a separate division within the court system. However, each case includes the presentation of evidence from both sides of the case and will likely include witness testimony.

Res Judicata

Writ of Mandamus

Prosecutors

Alibi

Arbitrary

Esquire

Caveat