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Easy to Understand Overview of the Circuit Court

Easy to Understand Overview of the Circuit Court

There are 13 Circuit Courts in the United States of America. A Circuit Court is an intermediate appellate court in the United States Federal court system. A Circuit Court can hear appeals that arise from the district courts located within their respective Federal judicial circuits. With the exception of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which has jurisdiction based upon subject matter, the jurisdiction of a Circuit Court is determined based on the geographic location in which the original ruling is handed down. 
The Circuit Courts serve as the final arbiter of most Federal cases since the Supreme Court of the United States of America has a small docket, hearing less than 100 cases each year. 
179 judges serve on the United States Circuit Court of Appeals. An appointment to one of the Circuit Courts is for a lifelong tenure and is subject to nomination by the President and confirmation by the Senate. The First Circuit Court is the circuit served by the smallest number of judges, which is appropriate because it is the smallest and least populated circuit. The Ninth Circuit Court is the most populated and has the most judges. 
The Circuit Court of Appeals is considered to be among the most powerful and influential courts in the nation. Since the legal precedents set by these courts can affect millions of people, the role of these courts is controversial.

Important Facts About the Tippecanoe County Court Records

Important Facts About the Tippecanoe County Court Records

Tippecanoe County Court Records can be referred to in order to learn about judicial transactions which have taken place in the overall system of the Indiana Circuit Court. The Tippecanoe County Court Records and the various transactions which take place through this system are given grounding in law through the State Constitution.
The Tippecanoe County Circuit Court has been in effect since 1826, and up to the present it is the only such system which had been established in Indiana. Tippecanoe County Court Records can deal with a number of legal issues as may come up, including those dealing with domestic issues, as well as major civil and criminal legal proceedings.
People interested in referring to Tippecanoe County Court Records can accordingly refer to the main location for the Indiana Circuit Court system, located in Lafayette, Indiana. Tippecanoe County Court Records may also be found to refer to the main Circuit Court Judge for this system, who at present is Judge Don Daniel.
In addition to various kinds of criminal, civil, and domestic matters, Tippecanoe County Court Records can also be located which deal with an array of such legal actions and devices as adopting people or gaining guardianship powers over them, leaving property to them in trusts or estates, and other activities generally identified under the term of probate law. Tippecanoe County Court Records, out of all of those courts in the State, will refer exclusively to such matters in that this Circuit Court possesses sole authority over such matters.

Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals At A Glance

Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals At A Glance

The 8th Circuit Court of Appeals is formally known as the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit. When it is referred to in case citations, it is known as the “8th Cir.” However it is known, the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals is a Federal court that has been granted appellate jurisdiction over the district courts located in these districts:
The Western District of Arkansas,
The Eastern District of Arkansas,
The Northern District of Iowa,
The Southern District of Iowa,
The District of Minnesota,
The Western District of Missouri,
The Eastern District of Missouri,
The District of Nebraska,
The District of North Dakota, and
The District of South Dakota.
There are 11 active judges on the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals, which is one of 13 United States Courts of Appeals. The 8th Circuit Court of Appeal is based in the Thomas F. Eagleton Courthouse in St. Louis, Missouri. 
Of the 13 Circuit Courts of Appeals, the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals

Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals At A Glance

Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals At A Glance

The Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals is formally known as the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. In case citations, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals is notated as “7th Cir.” The Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals is the Federal court that has appellate jurisdiction over courts that are located in:
 
The Northern District of Illinois,
The Central District of Illinois,
The Southern District of Illinois,
The Northern District of Indiana,
The Southern District of Indiana,
The Western District of Wisconsin, and
The Eastern District of Wisconsin
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals is unique because it is the only one of the 13 United States Courts of Appeal that has an internet presence that includes both a wiki and RSS feed that covers opinions and oral arguments presented by and before the Court. None of the other United States District or Appellate Courts offers oral arguments using these feeds to the internet, with the exception of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, although the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals only offers RSS features. Another notable fact about the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals is that its panel includes two of the premier scholars on law and economics: Chief Judge Frank H. Esterbrook and Judge Richard Posner.
As of July 2010, ten of the eleven seats in the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals are filled, with one nomination pending approval.  There are also six senior status judges involved with the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals.

Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals At A Glance

Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals At A Glance

The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals is known formally as the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals is one of 13 United States Courts of Appeals. When the decisions of the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals are referenced in the case citations, the Court is listed as “6th Cir.” This Federal court has appellate Jurisdiction over district courts that are located in these districts:
 
The Western District of Kentucky,
The Eastern District of Kentucky,
The Western District of Michigan,
The Eastern District of Michigan,
The Northern District of Ohio, 
The Southern District of Ohio,
The Western District of Tennessee,
The Middle District of Tennessee,
The Eastern District of Tennessee.
The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals hears its cases and presents its rulings at the Potter Stewart United States Courthouse in Cincinnati, Ohio. 
There are sixteen active judges who serve on the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals. The function of the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals is assisted by fourteen senior judges. 
There have been four judges elevated directly from the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals to the Supreme Court of the United States. Justice Howell Edmunds Jackson was elevated in 1893, Justice William R. Day in 1903, Justice Horace Harmond Lurton in 1909, and Justice Potter Stewart in 1958. William Howard Taft, the only man to serve as both President of the United State of America and Chief Justice of the United States, served on the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals prior to becoming President. 

Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals At A Glance

Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals At A Glance

The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals is formally known as the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. This court of appeals has appellate jurisdiction over district courts in:
 
The Western District of Louisiana,
The Middle District of Louisiana,
The Eastern District of Louisiana,
The Northern District of Mississippi,
The Southern District of Mississippi,
The Northern District of Texas,
The Eastern District of Texas,
The Southern District of Texas, and
The Western District of Texas.
Prior to October 1, 1981, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals included the Northern, Southern, and Middle Districts of Alabama, the Northern, Southern and Middle Districts of Florida, and the Northern, Southern and Middle Districts of Georgia, but these nine district courts were then separated into te Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals. However, as a result, decisions handed down by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals prior to the split are considered binding precedents in the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals had jurisdiction over the Panama Canal Zone between June 25, 1948, and March 31, 1982.
During the late 1950s the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals was crucial in advancing the civil rights of African-Americans, leading Chief Justice Elbert Tuttle, Judge John Minor Wisdom, Judge John Brown, and Judge Richard Rives to become known as the “Fifth Circuit Four”. Tuttle and Wisdom would lend their names to the courthouses which house the Eleventh and Fifth Circuit Court of Appeal, respectively.

Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals At A Glance

Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals At A Glance

The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals is a Federal court that is located in Richmond, Virginia. It is one of the thirteen district courts of appeal. The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals has been granted jurisdiction to hear appeals that originate in the nine districts below:
 
The District of Maryland,
The Western District of North Carolina,
The Middle District of North Carolina
The Eastern District of North Carolina,
The District of South Carolina,
The Western District of Virginia,
The Eastern District of Virginia,
The Northern District of West Virginia, and
The Southern District of West Virginia.
The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals is based at the Lewis F. Powell, Jr. United States Courthouse in Richmond, Virginia. There are 15 authorized judgeships associated with the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals. 13 of these positions are held by active justices, one by a senior judge who continues to hear cases on a part time basis, and two judges who have retired and no longer hear cases. 
Until recent years, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals has been considered the most conservative of the courts in the Federal Appellate System. Besides being extremely conservative, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals is also the most efficient of the thirteen circuits, taking just seven months to resolve each appeal. The Court is also extremely collegial, with a tradition that calls for the Justices to come down from the bench following each oral argument and greet the lawyers arguing before the Court.

Circuit Court Explained

Circuit Court Explained

Circuit Court
The modern Circuit Court system involves thirteen Circuit Courts of Appeals. There are eleven numbered Circuit Courts, the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. The only one of these Circuit Courts that is not restricted by geography is the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. 
Circuit Court Access

Circuit Court access has become much easier to obtain in recent years. In addition to Circuit Court access to rulings granted by West Publishing Company in the Federal Reporter and Federal Appendix, Circuit Court access can be found online. Circuit Court access involves each court’s website. 


Second Circuit Court of Appeals
The Second Circuit Court of Appeals represents New York, Connecticut, and Vermont. The Second Circuit Court of Appeals meets in downtown Manhattan. The Second Circuit Court of appeals is one or two Circuit Court of Appeals to have the majority of its members appointed by a single President, in this case President William Jefferson Clinton. 

Third Circuit Court of Appeals


The Third Circuit Court of Appeals has appellate jurisdiction over courts in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, and the United States Virgin Islands, making it one of the three Circuit Courts of Appeals to have appellate jurisdiction over a territory of the United States of America.


Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals

The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals hears appeals resulting from district court cases in West Virginia, Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, and South Carolina. The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals is the most efficient Circuit Court of Appeals, averaging seven months per appeal. 


Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals

The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals ceded appellate jurisdiction over Alabama, Georgia, and Florida to the newly established Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals in 1981, but retains jurisdiction over district courts in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi.


Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals

The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals is the appellate court for district courts in Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee. The Sixth Circuit Court seated the only man to serve as both President and Supreme Justice of the United States of America, President Howard Taft. 


Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals

The Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals reviews district court decisions in Wisconsin, Illinois, and Indiana. The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals is the most technologically advanced, featuring an online presence that involves the use of a wiki site and an RSS feed which allows individuals to obtain information about arguments presented in the cases. 
Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals

The 8th Circuit Court of Appeals is the appellate court for Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, and Arkansas. Until 1929, the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals had appellate jurisdiction over Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma, until these district courts were removed to form the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals.
Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals is the largest appellate district Court, covering Alaska, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, California, Nevada, Arizona, and Hawaii. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals also oversees courts in Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands.

Learn How to Obtain Circuit Court Access

Learn How to Obtain Circuit Court Access

An individual looking to obtain circuit court access so that they can find the latest public rulings of their local Circuit Court, or any Circuit Court in the United States of America, will have several options of how to obtain this information. Many Courts have moved towards making Circuit Court access available on their own websites. 
Ever since the first Circuit Courts of Appeal was established in 1911, Circuit Court access has been made possible through the publication of the rulings of the Circuit Courts of Appeal by the private company West Publishing in the Federal Reporter. However, the Federal Reporter only allows access to decisions that have been designated for publication by the Courts themselves. West publishes the “unpublished” opinions of all except for the Fifth and Eleventh Circuits separately in the Federal Appendix. 
However, in recent years the trend has become to obtain Circuit Court access online. The decisions of the Circuit Courts of Appeal are available in online databases such as Lexis or Westlaw. 
It is impossible to obtain unrestricted Circuit Court access. Some of the decisions of the Circuit Courts are restricted due to national security concerns. 
Circuit Court access to decisions may be affected by geographic concerns, since each Circuit Courts of Appeal may have different systems in place which can affect access to the court decisions.

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