Home Judgment

Judgment

What Are Supreme Court Judgments

What Are Supreme Court Judgments

Supreme Court judgments take place according to the procedures established by the United States Constitution. Decisions of this kind are made during a term of the Court, which lasts from the start of October in one year to either June or July during the next. Supreme Court judgments are provided, within the space of a single term, on the basis of alternating two week periods.
 
 
During the sittings of the Supreme Court, Supreme Court judgments can be made on cases already heard while new cases are also brought to the attention of the judges. In the recesses, meanwhile, the Justices write on and talk about the cases they have heard and the best Supreme Court judgments which should accordingly be issued. 
 
 
Supreme Court jurisdictions are typically made within the wide parameters established by the concept of appellate jurisdiction, as is one of the concerns of the Constitution’s language on the role of the Supreme Court. Supreme Court judgments are thus made almost without exception in regard to judgments already rendered by lower courts and can take the form of either affirming or overruling the decisions which were thus made.
 
 
Before the time of actually rendering the Supreme Court judgments, the Justices must in some way be exposed to the claims being made by those appealing a decision, which can be done in varying ways. A Petition for a Writ of Certiorari or an Extraordinary Writ, such as one for habeas corpus, are some of the legal actions which can precede Supreme Court judgments. 

What Are Judgments

What Are Judgments

Judgment
 
 
A judgment is a kind of legal action which brings a lawsuit or some other proceeding to a close based upon the issuing of a final decision by a court or judge. Judgments are typically binding and conclusive, or at least intended as such, though in many cases a judgment may be, such as through appellate jurisdiction, be appealed or even reversed. Judgments may not be viewed as final until the satisfaction of possible appeals. 
 
 
Summary Judgment
 
 
A summary judgment can be issued in cases in which it is deemed correct by the presiding judge or court that the circumstances for a full trial to take place are not present and it is not necessary to go through such a process of judicial decision-making. A motion for summary judgment may be filed by either the plaintiff or defendant involved in the specific legal action, with a greater burden of proof being imposed on plaintiffs.
 
 
Default Judgment
 
 
A default judgment can come at the conclusion of a court case in which the necessary procedure of the defendant answering a summons and taking part in the process does not occur. The default judgment will thus be issued against the defendant, and if applicable, will award to the plaintiff the amount in damages for which he or she initially asked. Disputes over this amount could, however, lead to more hearings.
 
 
Declaratory Judgment
 
 
A declaratory judgment is a motion which accords certain rights, duties and obligations to the participants in a lawsuit, but does not directly compel them to carry out specific actions. A declaratory judgment might be compared to the somewhat similar advisory opinion option for a judicial proceeding, but it differs in terms of possessing legal weight, if of a less actively applicable kind than other potential forms for a judgment. 
 
 
Judgment Recovery
 
 
Judgment recovery is a legal service offered by private individuals and companies, according to provisions in U.S. State law, on the premise of allowing plaintiffs in civil suits which were successfully processed through a court a means of recovering the damages which were awarded to them. In this regard, judgment recovery providers contend that the majority of damages awarded to plaintiffs are never collected, and accordingly require 50% commission fees out of the entire award. 
 
 
Supreme Court Judgments
 
 
Supreme Court judgments are made according to the appellate powers possessed by this Court, which have bearing on the whole of the United States and the legal processes which occur within it. A Supreme Court judgment will be issued during a term of the Court, a period which lasts from the beginning of October to either the June or July of the following year, and during the two week intervals when the Court is sitting and not in recess. 

A Quick Guide to Summary Judgment

A Quick Guide to Summary Judgment

A summary judgment is one of the forms in which the basic type of judgment can be made. In this regard, a summary judgment can be distinguished from the other possible kinds of judgments in that it occurs without the full process of a trial having been observed by the court and the parties to the suit before the decision is made. A motion for summary judgment can be accepted by a court in the United States based upon the finding that certain kinds of conditions are present in the case. 
 
 
The issuing of a summary judgment can thus be decided upon by a court based on two circumstances found to be present in the case. In one case, a motion for summary judgment might be appealed for if it is shown and thus found by the court that no material fact is present which can allow for a trial to be brought to a different conclusion. A summary judgment can be made if one participant in the suit is clearly favored by legal regulations.
 
 
The person who chooses to make the motion for summary judgment is the moving party. A motion for summary judgment will be written to include the whole “case-in-chief” of the moving party, as comprises the whole case that would be presented before the court.
 
 
Alternately, the moving party responsible for submitting the motion for summary judgment could also be the defendant. This summary judgment only requires disproving a single aspect of the plaintiff’s case. 

Understnading Default Judgment

Understnading Default Judgment

A default judgment is one of the specific forms in which the general category of the legal motion of a judgment can be made. A default judgment is made as a final decision of the court with jurisdiction over the case in the specific instance of the defendant’s failure to act on a summons served on him or her, and thus, participate in the legal process which could have led to a full-fledged judgment. A default judgment is thus issued in favor of the plaintiff, thus returning the damages or other benefits initially named in the suit filed. 
The specific place of a default judgment in the legal system of the United States is often, though not always, provided for by Rule 55 and Rule 60 in the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. Moreover, a default judgment in U.S. law may also be applied in the specific settings of State and Federal-level courts, or in various kinds of Government agencies which have some degree of judicial power.
The broad applicability of a default judgment, specifically in terms of the benefits to be returned to the plaintiff, can be modified through the presence of a degree of uncertainty concerning the validity of the damages claimed. While a default judgment will, in the absence of other factors, mean that the original amount named by the plaintiff will accordingly be provided, this default judgment can require an additional hearing. 

Declaratory Judgment Explained

Declaratory Judgment Explained

A declaratory judgment is one of the categories in which the general legal action of a judgment, as the final decision made by a court in the process of hearing a lawsuit, can be placed. In this specific instance, the declaratory judgment can be distinguished from other kinds of judgments in that it has bearing on both the rights and duties possessed by participants in the suit, instead of in terms of ordering the participants to perform certain kinds of actions.
That being said, while a declaratory judgment is not considered to be as actively binding as other kinds of judgments, it can be distinguished from the otherwise similar legal action of a court-issued advisory opinion in that it does possess legal authority over the suit, if not to the same extent over the participants in the suit. 
A declaratory judgment could also be issued outside of the specific legal setting of a courtroom, such as by a governmental agency which possesses some form of judicial authority, in which case it might instead be referred to as a declaratory ruling. Moreover, a declaratory judgment might be accompanied, in the event that it is issued by a court, by such additional legal actions as injunctions or decisions on the obligations of one party to pay damages to the other.
A declaratory judgment might be sought prior to the issuing of a lawsuit which is being anticipated, or in anticipation of a conflict occurring between legal and contract rights during lawsuits. 

Res Judicata

Writ of Mandamus

Prosecutors

Alibi

Arbitrary

Esquire

Caveat