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What You Must Know About Probate Court

What You Must Know About Probate Court

 

Probate courts are courts that preside over issues regarding deceased individuals and their wills. A will is a legal document that is written up by an individual, often with the help of an attorney or other legal official. This document outlines who is to take charge of an individual’s estate and where their specific belongings are supposed to go upon their death, whether they are supposed to be given to specific family members or donated to an organization. 

However, sometimes wills can be contested for the validity because another will document shows up and is introduced or because of the notarization on the document. This is where the probate courts look over the circumstances and the evidence in order to determine legitimacy. The probate courts are often the ones to make the decision on who has control of the estate of the deceased and where the allocations go. 

Besides issues of estate and the deceased, probate courts can also deal with issues like the granting of guardianships, name changes, and marriages. In some cases, these courts can also handle issues of adoption. 

The probate courts are important because this is where individuals go in order to gain family status and legal rights of protection regarding adoption and guardianship. However, they are also important because this is the court that grants access of individuality or union. Individuality refers to when it comes to deciding on one’s new name, whether it is a preference of name or a matter of protection. Union refers to when it comes to marrying to willing individuals together for a lifetime of shared happiness. 

Franklin County Probate Court

Franklin County Probate Court

The Franklin County probate court of Ohio is dedicated to dealing with matters of adoption, certified name change, birth record correction, guardianship, psychiatric commitment, birth registration, and issues of estate administration for the deceased. 
When it comes to working with the Franklin Country probate court, individuals must obtain the specific forms to fill out in order to have their date come up in court. The forms are all specific to the type of business that an individual or family wants to bring forth. Once the forms are filed, the court will process them and approve a court date or deny the requisition. 
From there individuals or families that have filed a form and have been approved will be given a court date. On the court date they can come in and plead their cases and request consideration of the judge for a ruling. In some cases, like that of a name change, it can be a matter of protection, or simply a desired change, and the judge might have to only grant legal approval for the endeavor. 
However, when bigger issues come to the Franklin County probate court, like issues of estate administration and conflict over a will, this is where the judge will have to carefully examine every piece of evidence that comes through and take into consideration witness testimony. Wills can be argued over legitimacy based on notarization and updates done on a copy that was hidden away for some time. This is also where families bring issues regarding what belongings they might want. 
The Franklin County probate court looks to quickly and effectively solve these types of matters so that all of the parties involved can get an agreeable outcome. 

Wayne County Probate Court

Wayne County Probate Court

The goal of the Wayne County probate court is to provide fair and equal justice to those who are seeking it through the help of a motivated and knowledgeable staff. In doing so, the Wayne County probate office hopes to inspire the county and the public in the belief of justice and in the convictions of the court. 
Wayne County probate court deals with issues of guardianship for minors, conservatorships, and issues of estate inquiry and movement. The Wayne County probate court has a smaller repertoire of cases that are dealt with in this particular court. The most common are issues of guardianship. Guardianship often deals with the limited or full guardianship of minors, and guardianship of individuals who are considered disabled, and require legal protection. 
In order to get a judge to hear the case, the proper paperwork has to be filed first. Adults can download the pertinent documents necessary for their cases on the Wayne County probate court website. Once the forms are all filled out, they are brought to the court along with the processing fee and submitted. From there they go through processing and can be brought up to the court. 
The court’s judge will then hear the case under the pretenses that it is brought forth by. And with this, individuals who are seeking guardianship must prove through financial records and testimony as to why they would be considered fit guardians. In some cases, this is a matter of a family member dying and an individual was named guardian in a will. This is where the legal responsibility is granted to the individual and they are named the guardian.  
The Wayne County probate court takes care in filing and hearing these types of cases before granting privilege and guardianship. They are also very thorough when it comes to estate administration and issues of will inquiries as well. 

Mobile County Probate Court

Mobile County Probate Court

The Mobile County Probate Court is a small court system in the second most populated county in the State of Alabama. This particular court focuses less on issues regarding criminal activity. Instead it is more based on the acquisition and distribution of property regarding descendants’ estates, adoption, guardianship, conservatorships, and the issue of condemnation of land for public use. The latter is also referred to as eminent domain.
What this means is that the Mobile County Probate Court does not process and punish those who are considered to be criminals. Instead it is a court that tends to the public matters of the county and issues of family and housing. 
Under the term of family, this is where adoption, guardianship, and even the commitment of the mentally ill can be placed. In regards to adoption and guardianship, the court takes special care to look over the qualifications and circumstances of individuals who are looking into matters of adopting or guardianship. 
In regards to the commitment of the mentally ill, this is where a family must decide what to do with someone who is mentally ill. If they cannot handle the responsibility of protecting and taking care of their ill family member, having them legally required to go to a treatment facility might be the only option. 
In regards to property, this is where the issues of estate administration and condemnation of land for public use comes in. The former is where a will bequeaths items to family and friends. However, this can be contested due to issues of mental cognizance and various other issues. Regarding property in condemnation of land, this is where land is estimated and given a value to the family. The family is required to leave the property and move to a new home. 

Hamilton County Probate Court

Hamilton County Probate Court

Hamilton County probate court has one of the more extensive listings of services provided by the probate court. Hamilton County probate court entertains cases of: name changes, birth registration, birth record correction, trusts, civil proceedings, civil commitments, declarations of paternity, guardianship, conservatorship, adoption, disinterment, estate administration, and more. 
The Hamilton County probate court takes on many issues regarding family property, family relations, and personal information correction or change. This is important to understand when it comes to knowing about different courts. Unlike many other courts, a probate court looks more into civil proceedings and less into criminal actions that have occurred. 
As an informational tool, the Hamilton County probate court is helpful when it comes to giving important information regarding legal status changes in name or relationship-wise. This is important when it comes to operating within legal means. Individuals who change their names often have many different agencies to identify in order to let them know of these changes. 
Regarding property and legal rights, the probate court can help with the distribution of property for individuals who have passed away. And in cases where individuals believed that a family member has been buried in a wrong plot or that their body has been lost, they can obtain the legal right to disinterment. This allows the casket to be dug up in order to find out the status of the body and if it has been misplaced. 
All of the aforementioned legal issues are important when it comes to understanding and operating within one’s legal rights and helps to provide individuals with legal family times that they have always wanted. 

Connecticut Probate Court

Connecticut Probate Court

The Connecticut probate court is a court system that has been a work in progress and development for over 300 years. The main goal of the CT probate court is to provide efficient services and law to individuals who are looking for help and justice in the Connecticut probate court. 
The CT probate court handles a variety of different, yet very sensitive cases. Some of these cases are issues of estate administration in regards to wills and the allocation of assets upon a person’s death. Then there are cases of how to better assist individuals who have mental or physical disabilities and who is the most suitable guardian for these individuals. This is applicable to both children and adults who are afflicted with these types of disabilities. 
What the Connecticut probate court strives to do is to best protect the rights of individuals in the cases of adoption and guardianship in order to provide them stability and protection in a good family environment, while providing support and service measures for the individuals who are taking on the parental or guardianship role. 
Overall, the CT probate court works on a number of different cases, anywhere from issues of guardianship to estate administration and even civil issues regarding housing and property issues. These cases are all important because they deal with the civil rights of families and a desire for service and protection, an outreach for help from a family to a court system in order to ensure that one will be allotted all the rights which are given by the State. 

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