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Nevada Supreme Court

Nevada Supreme Court

The Nevada Judicial system includes such various systems as the Nevada Supreme Court and Clark County courts. In addition to these institutions, the Nevada judiciary includes different institutions like the Justice Courts, the Municipal Courts, and the District Courts. Of the last of these, the Nevada Supreme Court has final authority over decisions which are made through this body.
 
 
The Nevada Supreme Court dates back, as an institution in its own right and as an arbiter over these lower court institutions, to the period when Nevada first achieved statehood status in 1864. 
 
 
Its creation gave the institution final power over the Clark County courts and other District Court systems, of which there are 9 in total, having been created to provide for the judicial needs of 17 different counties. 
 
 
The Nevada Supreme Court functions mainly in an appeal-reviewing capacity, thereby placing the decisions taken and rulings made previously by lower Districts courts, such as the Clark County Courts, under a microscope. 
 
 
The Nevada Supreme Court is concerned, moreover, not with the physical evidence or other data which might have been entered into those initial judicial proceedings, but specifically with the question of whether the Clark County courts, for instance, might have made a mistake in ruling on the basis of such evidence entered into consideration. 
 
 
In this regard, such oversight over Clark County courts and other lower District courts is rendered by the Nevada Supreme Court through the decisions of 7 Justices on the bench, a number thus fixed in 1997. 

What You Need to Know About The Michigan Courts

What You Need to Know About The Michigan Courts

The legal system of Michigan courts can be looked into online through a website set up by the State Government, entitled “Michigan Courts-One Court of Justice.” According to the Michigan court rules, the infrastructure of Michigan courts is composed of two basic kinds of settings in which motions can be initially heard and cases initially tried: the District Michigan courts and the various Circuit Michigan courts, including such various institutions as the Macomb County Circuit Court.
 
 
Michigan court rules provide for the ultimate authority, over lower institutions such as the Macomb County Circuit Court, in the forms of the lower, or intermediate, appellate court, and then the final arbiter of the State Supreme Court of Michigan courts. 
 
 
In terms of the division of responsibilities between the settings for trials in the Michigan courts system, those of Circuit courts, such as the Macomb County Circuit Court, are tasked with carrying out proceedings dealing with the most serious forms of offenses against the legal system. 
 
 
This is in contrast to the correspondingly less serious cases that are dealt with, according to Michigan court rules, by District Michigan courts. As such, Macomb County Circuit Court and other circuit Michigan courts possess judicial powers of the widest applicability for the whole of the State legal system.
 
 
In addition to Macomb County Circuit Court, there are 56 different Circuit Michigan courts throughout the State as a whole. The judges who preside over Circuit Michigan courts hold terms lasting for up to six years on the bench. 

Quick View of MN Courts

Quick View of MN Courts

Documentation produced by the cases heard and decisions rendered through the judiciary system of Minnesota (MN) courts can be referred to online through a website set up by the State Government for the use of both members of the public and participants in the legal profession. 
 
 
The Access Case Records function on the Minnesota Judicial Branch online site offers an Internet-based tool for addressing queries in this way, through an MPA Remote search. These searches for MN Court records are accordingly carried out on a State-wide basis and in a manner accessible to members of the public.
 
 
MPA stands for Minnesota Trial Court Public Access Remote view, according to the previous model established by the Government usage-restricted MNCIS, or Minnesota Court Information System. Up to 2009, Internet Explorer browsers were limited to easy access to MN court records through this kind of search function. 
 
 
The ability to gain access to documentation produced by the processes of MN courts and the cases which come under their purview is subject to some degree of restriction as established by State regulations on MN court records. Specifically, the restrictions placed on MN court records is carried out by Rule 8, Subdivision 2 of the Minnesota Rules of Public Access to Records of the Judicial Branch. 
 
 
In this regard, people will not be able to glean from MN court records the names or locations of individuals involved in criminal, misdemeanor, or traffic-related offenses at home, but must use a terminal in one of the MN courts. 

Mississippi Supreme Court

Mississippi Supreme Court

The Mississippi Supreme Court is the judicial institution which has been tasked with the functions of general oversight over the whole of the Mississippi judiciary. As such, the Mississippi Supreme Court is considered to be the State’s highest court. 
 
 
The function of the institution in the State legal system is provided for in the Constitution, and as such, the Mississippi Supreme Court has existed since 1817.
 
 
According to historical oversights of what is technically referred to as the Supreme Court of Mississippi, the institution of the Mississippi Supreme Court was initially referred to as the High Court of Errors and Appeals. People can locate the physical offices of the Mississippi Supreme Court and the Justices who sit on the bench for the Court in the city of Jackson. 
 
 
In that the basic function of the Mississippi Supreme Court in the State judiciary as a whole is to hear and pass judgments on appeals, it is considered to be an appellate court, rather than a trial court. In this regard, the Mississippi Supreme Court is one of two appellate courts in the State, with the other court filling this function being the Mississippi Court of Appeals. 
 
 
While filling its specific duties, the Mississippi Supreme Court does so through the efforts of nine Justices who have been appointed to the position, typically holding their offices for terms lasting for an 8 year period. As of 2010, the Chief Justice of the Mississippi Supreme Court was William L. Waller, Jr., supported by Presiding Justices George C. Carlson, Jr., and James E. Graves, Jr. 

Don’t Miss Out On This Quick Guide to Missouri Courts

Don't Miss Out On This Quick Guide to Missouri Courts

Missouri courts can be referred to for information and other matters through the website established by the State Government, referred to as “Your Missouri Courts.” Moreover, people who are interested in Missouri court cases and the documentation produced by them can accordingly refer to another website set up by the Government of the State, Case.net, which is an Automated Case Management System for the storage and retrieval of Missouri court records.
 
 
Missouri courts records can be produced by a number of different kinds of Missouri court cases which can be tried through the State judicial system and can be heard in a number of different kinds of Missouri courts, which are described as being for the benefit of Missouri residents and others on the Your Missouri Courts website.
 
 
As such, Missouri courts are considered to comprise of three different levels for judicial institutions, having differing kinds of jurisdiction over different kinds of Missouri court cases. Missouri court records can be located which refer, in this regard, alternately to circuit Missouri courts, to the Missouri Court of Appeals, or the Missouri State Supreme Court, representing the ultimate source of authority over Missouri courts.
 
 
In addition to the circuit Missouri courts which hear civil and criminal cases, these courts also hear Missouri court cases which come in specialized categories, such as those dealing with juvenile or drug-involved defendants, with the processing of property through probate-type proceedings, and for cases which involve family and domestic relations. Missouri courts of this type are specially created on a regional basis. 

Court of Delaware

Court of Delaware

The court of Delaware is set up with the Supreme Court and the highest courts. The court of Delaware that falls below that is the Superior Court, as well as the Court of Chancery. There is also Family Court, the Court of Common Pleas and the Justice of the Peace Court.
 
 
The court of Delaware which can influence the outcomes decided in the lower courts is the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court may hear cases which include accusations of misconduct by a judge during a trial. If that misconduct may have influenced the verdict in a case, the Supreme Court may overturn the verdict. Each court which falls below the Supreme Court must abide by decisions made in that Court.
 
 
The rest of the court system in Delaware works as a pyramid, with each court answering to the one above it. This system works as a check and balance to be sure that no one court controls too much of the power within the judicial system. 
 
 
The Justice of the Peace Court is the lowest level of court and hears cases which include disputed values or judgments of less than fifteen thousand dollars. The Court may also hear criminal cases and traffic violation cases. Each of the courts in the judicial system has a specific purpose and function, which ensures a fair legal process for the residents of Delaware.

Quick Look at the CT Court

Quick Look at the CT Court


The CT court system is divided according to jurisdiction. Each court has specific functions and operates according to those functions. The State of CT judicial branch is comprised of the Supreme Court, which is the highest court in the State, the Superior Court, the Probate Court, and the Appellate Court. 


 


The Supreme Court is the highest court, making decisions regarding cases which have already been decided by lower courts. The CT judicial branch answers to the Supreme Court. If there are accusations of legal actions which may have influenced the outcome of a case in the lower courts, the Supreme Court may toss out the verdict. However the Supreme Court does not hear actual trials. 


 


The Superior Court, which is the next lowest in the CT judicial branch, hears a myriad of cases, including civil cases, criminal cases and family law cases.


 


The other courts in the State of CT judicial branch include the Appellate Courts and the Probate Court. The Probate Court handles issues with estates and wills. The Probate Court may hear cases which involve challenges to a will, including accusations that the will was written under duress. 


 


Each part of the State of CT judicial branch has a specific function and purpose. The different parts of the CT court system also serve as a check and balance, with each court answering to the Supreme Court if there are accusations of misconduct which influenced the outcome of a case.

Johnson County Courts

Johnson County Courts

As one of the judicial districts of Kansas, Johnson County courts can administer a number of legal proceedings and measures which might come up for residents of the State. Moreover, people who are interested in legal matters arising in this area of the State can also refer to a website established for the Johnson County courts by the State Government.
 
 
People can thus secure access to documents produced by legal actions previously taken under consideration and processed by one of the Johnson County courts. Moreover, the Johnson County courts online site can also assist with driving directions to the courthouses maintained by this legal system, and with information on the judges who are currently presiding over Johnson County courts. 
 
 
The activity of securing access to a document placed in the Johnson County courts will be subject to the rules previously established under the Open Records Act. In terms of the general application of this law to courthouses and court records throughout the whole of the State, as well as simply that of Johnson County courts, people can choose to refer to the guide established by the State Government and hosted at the Kansas Judicial Branch site as a “Guide to the Open Records Act.”
 
 
Inquiries to the Johnson County courts which deal, instead, with the issue of criminal records as pertaining to employment/credit background checks will instead come under the heading of the Kansas Bureau of Investigation. Records of the Johnson County courts can also be accessed physically at the County Clerk’s Office during the week. 

KY Courts

KY Courts

People interested in the legal proceedings that have been undertaken and are underway in the setting of Kentucky (KY) courts can refer to the Kentucky Court of Justice online website. In this regard, the site, established by the State Government, provides information on the ongoing KY court dockets in terms of the various levels of KY courts, including the Court of Appeals, the ultimate judicial arbiter of the State Supreme Court, and the two systems of District and Circuit KY courts.
 
 
Before using the KY Courts online site to refer to any of these kinds of KY court dockets, users will be asked to note a disclaimer to the effect that information made available online can be changed and should not be relied upon as an authoritative source of legally verified information as the current disposition of ongoing KY court dockets. 
 
 
People interested in KY court dockets in terms of the legal actions currently being considered in the Circuit KY courts will be asked to provide the name of the specific county in which they are interested when carrying out a KY dockets online search on the State website. 
 
 
To this end, there are 57 different circuits for KY courts throughout the whole of the State. Moreover, State residents and others with some reason for interest in Kentucky judicial proceedings can choose to refer to the KY court dockets of either the Western or Eastern District for KY courts. Information on KY court dockets as a whole is administered by the Administrative Office of the Courts, or AOC. 

Louisiana Supreme Court

Louisiana Supreme Court

The Louisiana Supreme Court is the primary legal institution for the overall judicial infrastructure for the whole of the U.S. State of Louisiana (LA). In this regard, the LA Supreme Court is considered to be that of a “last resort” nature, in that the Louisiana Supreme Court does not function to begin the hearings for cases or originate legal proceedings, but instead bears responsibility for being the last institution in the State where appeals issued on cases can be heard before they are redirected to the United States Supreme Court.
 
 
The history of the Louisiana Supreme Court has been traced back to the period in the colonial settling of North America by Europeans when the Louisiana region was under the control of Spanish and French authorities, and to an early point in the U.S. presence in the area when the Louisiana Supreme Court as an institution was known instead as the LA Supreme Court. 
 
 
The very beginnings of the Louisiana Supreme Court, going back to a point preceding even that of the LA Superior Court, is fixed at the 1712 establishment of a Superior Council by the French government which functioned, as is still true of LA Supreme Court traffic in the present, for taking in appeals and rendering a final decision on their validity.
 
 
The LA Supreme Court was created, when Louisiana was not yet a state but instead a territory, having been newly purchased by the Jefferson administration from Napoleon in 1804, and was then converted into the Louisiana Supreme Court by the 1812 passage of a State Constitution. 

Discover the Different State Courts

Discover the Different State Courts

State Court
 
 
State courts are the highest level of courts. Each State has a court system which involves lower courts, on the county level, for instance, and a State Supreme Court, which is the highest court at the State level. Each county within the State generally has a county court, which would be found in the county seat or county capital. County courts generally hear criminal trails and civil trials.
 
 
State Supreme Court
 
 
State Supreme Courts are the highest level of courts on the State level. The State Supreme Court hears cases in which the involved individuals believe that the outcome of a trial in a lower court was unfair or involved evidence which was not based on fact. Any cases which had outcomes based on legal errors made by the lower courts may be overruled by the State’s Supreme Court.
 
 
Illinois
 
 
The judicial system of Illinois consists of 23 different Circuit courts which have been created for the 97 counties in the State as a whole, including Lake, McHenry, Will, DuPage, and Cook County Circuit courts, while others are composed of multiple, generally comparatively small Circuit courts. In the Illinois judicial system, the largest Circuit Court is that of Cook County, which includes Chicago under its legal jurisdiction.
 
 
Kansas 
 
 
Johnson County courts represent one component of the overall judicial system of the U.S. State of Kansas. Residents of Johnson County, Kansas, or out-of-state individuals otherwise concerned with ongoing legal proceedings and matters within the area, may wish to refer to the available, online source for legal information as consists of the State Government site’s Internet-based search function. Information from Johnson County courts is accordingly made available as provided for by the Open Records Act. 
 
 
Kentucky
 
 
The Kentucky (KY) Courts system is composed of a legal infrastructure which includes the presiding authority of the State Supreme Court as well as the two District and Circuit KY court dockets, which were created for accepting and handling different kinds of legal matters which may arise in the State. The Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC) is responsible for administering specific information as to the ongoing processes and motions being handled on the KY court dockets. 
 
 
Louisiana
 
 
The Louisiana Supreme Court is a “last resort” legal institution, in the sense that it possesses the ultimate appellate authority over the decisions and judgments rendered by the lower courts in the overall Louisiana (LA) judicial system. Prior to being known as the Supreme Court, this institution was called the LA Superior Court. LA Superior Court Traffic at this point, in the early 18th century, consisted of documents issued by the colonial French government.
 
 
District Court of Maryland
 
 
The Maryland Court of Appeals is the acting Supreme Court, to use a term more routinely enlisted for this purpose in the American judicial system, for the legal system of this particular State. Maryland Court cases can generally be looked into, with exceptions for Prince George County and Montgomery County, through the online function of a Maryland Judiciary Case Search, having been offered by the State Government beginning with 2006. 
 
 
Michigan
 
 
The “Michigan Courts-One Court of Justice” site contains information on Michigan court rules and such various areas as the Macomb County Circuit Court. Michigan courts are thus administered by the State Supreme Court, which holds ultimate and appellate power over the lower courts which have the ability to originate legal proceedings. Fifty-seven different Michigan Circuit courts exist throughout the State as a whole, administered by six year term judges. 
 
 
Minnesota
 
 
The Minnesota (MN) Courts system can be accessed, in terms of the MN court records which it produces from legal proceedings, through the Minnesota Judicial Branch Access Case Records search function, which is the MPA Remote search, or Minnesota Trial Court Public Access Remote view. The Minnesota Rules of Public Access to Records of the Judicial Branch, in particular Rule 8, Subdivision 2, provides for permissible limits on access to MN court records. 
 
 
Mississippi
 
 
The Mississippi Supreme Court is a legal institution which dates back to 1817, when it was first referred to as the High Court of Errors and Appeals, and as such, is currently based out of the City of Jackson. The Mississippi Supreme Court exercises appellate functions in regard to the legal proceedings initiated in lower courts of the Mississippi judicial system. The Mississippi Supreme Court Chief Justice is Judge William L. Waller, Jr.
 
 
Missouri
 
 
The legal infrastructure of Missouri courts can be referred to through the “Your Missouri Courts” website established by the State Government. In this way, Missouri court records can be located through the query functions offered by the Automated Case Management System. Missouri court cases can be looked into through this way as originate from the three various legal levels of the Missouri Supreme Court, the Missouri Court of Appeals, or the Missouri Circuit Court systems. 
 
 
Nevada
 
 
The Nevada Supreme Court exercises appellate functions over the Nevada Judicial system as a whole, administering such various institutions as the Clark County Courts. The Nevada Supreme Court bench has been filled since 1997 by 7 justices who will hear the ultimate appeal over legal decisions rendered in the State before a case goes out of Nevada. The Nevada Supreme Court was first created in 1864, when the territory first achieved statehood status in the U.S. 
 
 
New Jersey
 
 
The New Jersey (NJ) courts system can provide information to State residents and people otherwise concerned with legal matters in the State through the NJ Courts Online search function. The NJ Courts Online search engine can provide for documents pertaining to a variety of various legal matters, including both criminal law, and such civil law matters as traffic-related legal matters, domestic and family law, and the provision of property in an estate. 
 
 
New Mexico
 
 
New Mexico (NM) courts are administered, ultimately, according to the appellate authority exercised by the New Mexico State Supreme Court, which has its offices in Santa Fe. Five Justices serve on this body of the NM courts, and as a whole exercise “last resort” powers over cases and appeals raised in relation to them in the State of New Mexico, after which appeals will go out of the State and beyond the legal supervision of the NM courts. 
 
 
New York 
 
 
The New York State judicial system is administered by the Court of Appeals, which fulfills the function more typically filled in other U.S. states by institutions formally referred to as State Supreme Courts. In New York State, on the other hand, a State Supreme Court carries out trial, rather than appellate, duties, initiating the legal proceedings concerning some matter of interest under law, including both significant criminal offenses and certain kinds of civil matters. 
 
 
North Carolina
 
 
North Carolina (NC) courts can come in the forms of either an Appellate Division or Trial Division court, and, in one single instance, in the form of the appellate body of the North Carolina State Supreme Court. Information on North Carolina legal proceedings can be appealed to from the available North Carolina (NC) calendars and NC court dates as have been made available and easily viewable online, though with some exceptions based on courts’ financial difficulties. 
 
 
North Dakota
 
 
The North Dakota (ND) courts judicial system is ultimately under the appellate jurisdiction of the North Dakota Supreme Court. Under this body are placed the 7 district-level ND courts, and under these the Municipal ND courts, as has variously provide for the 53 North Dakota counties. In 2010, the Chief Justice of the North Dakota judicial system was Gerald W. VandeWalle, who is one five Justices appointed to sit on the bench of the North Dakota Supreme Court. 

United State Courts At A Glance

United State Courts At A Glance

The United States court system is separated according to jurisdiction. Cases which involve State charges or State issues, such as divorce, are handled by State courts. U.S. courts may sometimes dispute who has jurisdiction for criminal cases, especially when the case involves State and Federal charges. The defendant may in fact be charged in Federal court and in State court on separate charges. 
 
 
U.S. courts handle a myriad of cases and criminal and civil cases are generally handled by the State courts. Evidence may be presented in State court, but criminal cases are often handled by a court which will be located in the county seat or county capital. 
 
 
Civil cases may also be heard in the county court system, which is a division of the State court system. In general, lawyers will attempt to resolve civil cases before they are heard in court.
 
 
Cases in which the individuals are not satisfied with an outcome, such as in civil cases, can be challenged and brought to a higher court. However, the State may not bring criminal charges to a higher court if they are not satisfied with the outcome of a criminal case. The defendant is protected from being charged with the same crime by two courts, or even twice by the same court, due to the double jeopardy rule.
 
 
There are several jurisdictions in the country which are not part of a State, such as Washington D.C. However, Washington D.C. has a court system which is set up similarly to a state court system.

Quick Outline of State Supreme Court

Quick Outline of State Supreme Court


In the United States, there are several levels of courts. The State Supreme Court is the highest court within each State's jurisdiction. The State Supreme Court hears cases which involve appeals of the lower court decisions within the State. In fact, the State Supreme Court does not hear trials, but instead hears cases in which individuals involved in trials in the lower courts believe that the outcome was unfair or based on facts which were not supported by evidence.  


 


State Supreme Courts hear cases in which it is believed that there was a legal error made in the original case. For example, a judge may have allowed facts into evidence which should not have been legally allowed. Cases which involve problems with the jury, including the presentation of facts which should not have been heard, may also be presented to State Supreme Courts. If the State Supreme Court determines that the case involved an error of justice, the case may be heard again in the lower courts.


 


States Supreme Courts are made up of a panel of judges which are appointed according to the rules and regulations, as laid out by each State's Constitution. When these judges make a decision, it is legally binding for all parties involved and must be accepted by the other courts, as well as the individuals involved in the case. 


 


However, there are cases in which the finding of a State Supreme Court can be overruled, if there are Federal issues involved for instance. 

Res Judicata

Writ of Mandamus

Prosecutors

Alibi

Arbitrary

Esquire

Caveat