What are the Maryland Courts

What are the Maryland Courts

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What are the Maryland Courts
The District Court of Maryland stands apart from other Maryland courts in the sense that it is a part of the Federal Government, rather than of the MD Courts system, which is administered by and under the authority of the State Government. Cases which do not apply to other Maryland courts based out of the State rather than in Federal statutes will accordingly be held through the District Court of Maryland. 
This institution, among other Maryland courts, is under the control of Chief Judge Deborah K. Chasanow, among the ten MD courts members who are part of this body. When the defendant in a case being considered by the District Court of Maryland happens to be the United States as a political entity, then the United States Attorney’s Office is represented in Maryland courts. When a decision made by the District Court of Maryland has an appeal issued against it, the decision on the motion will not be made by other Maryland courts, but rather by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.
There are not multiple Maryland courts of this type, but rather one District Court of Maryland due to the provisions laid out in the United States Code. Instead of two MD court districts, the District Court of Maryland has two divisions: the South and the North. One of the most notable historical facts attached to the District Court of Maryland is that one of the former justices in these Maryland courts was one-time Declaration of Independence signer William Paca. 

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